NUIM Teaching Fellowship Awards – Report 2012-2013

I was successful in being awarded a NUIM teaching fellowship for 2012-2013 which examined achieving fairness in assessing student group work. This was the first teaching fellowship awarded to the School of Business. The results from the fellowship have just been published by the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) in  NUI Maynooth. This blog highlights the findings of the fellowship; the full report will be available on eprints. In my view the promise of group work as a teaching and learning method can only be fully realized if perennial problems such as accurate and fair assessment of individual group member performance, intra-group conflict, and free riding are successfully tackled. I have long been intrigued by the promise of using peer evaluation to maximize the learning value that Continue reading here [...]

NUIM & NKU create International Marketing Teams to work on P&G Tide Coldwater / Ariel Project!

Over the past year (2012/13) I have been working with my colleague Dr David Raska at the Northern Kentucky University (NKU) in the United States to collaborate on a live International Marketing project set within our respective classrooms. As of September 2013 all this planning give way to implementation. Over the past number of weeks, my final year International Marketing students have been working with students in NKU to work on a P&G client project. The designated task is to work in International Teams (Irish / American) to create a Global Marketing Strategy for P&G's Tide Coldwater / Ariel product. This has been a big change for students in this class, who have never had the opportunity to work on a P&G task nor in International teams, with the use of technology Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – Doing the Basics

HRM received bad press recently with many commentators questioning its value to organisations. The resignation of the HR Director of the BBC has raised questions over the efficacy of the discipline. Why the resignation of one person should spark calls for a review of the area or even questions over the feminsation of HR is anyone's guess. But harm us it has and we need to think hard about how we got here and more importantly how we are going to get away from this negative spotlight. This is important for all of us as we go through the 'Ulrichisation' of the profession - a time of great change. But it's also important not least women, because HR has been one of the areas where women have succeeded most in achieving management positions. Last week in this blog I suggested that academics and Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – The ADDIE Model, Practitioners and Academics Living Apart

Having crossed over the line between HRM practice and academia I am conscious more than ever of how these two communities live very much apart. I'm sure the way it's supposed to work is that the practice 'surfaces' its concerns and the academia takes up the challenge ultimately informing practice of what its concerns should  be. Or something like that. However, during my time as a practitioner I never felt assisted by Irish academics helping me to understand my challenges as a manager and now that I'm in academia I'm often puzzled at how oblivious Practice is regarding the work that is going on in Irish universities. A good example of this is the ADDIE model. This model is a staple approach to identifying training needs and implementing and evaluating training. Developed (perhaps) by the Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – Crossing The Line

Nicosia is the last divided city in Europe - a title inherited when Berlin was unified over 20 years ago. You can step across the Green Line dividing the city without much fuss these days. The authorities on the south side minimise the perception that this is a de facto border. Those on the north side make every attempt to convince you that you have stepped into another jurisdiction.  Most of what first hits you in the narrow lanes there are street vendors selling cheap goods of all sorts to attract the southern and tourist euro. But there are some interesting sights to see that have been left over from previous occupations. Selimye mosque is one such venue. Built by the Lusignans in the 12th century it was subsequently taken over by the Ottomans in the Middle Ages when it became a mosque. Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – One Week In

This is one of the abiding images of Cyprus. It is the representation of the flag of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (recognised only by Turkey). It is etched into the Pentactylos mountain range in the occupied area across the Green Line that divides the two communities on this beautiful island. Inhabitants of Nicosia come face to face with this image daily as it is visible from almost every part of the city. It is, perhaps, meant to be a provocative reminder to those on the south side of the line of everything they have lost as a result of the Turkish invasion of 1974. One hesitates to ask older residents what they feel about this for fear of stoking up hurt or anger. But maybe that's my issue because although I focus on this image, Cypriots seem to ignore it. This is mostly true Continue reading here [...]

How to Innovate the Newspaper Industry? Part 1 of 2

Have newspapers written their own obituary?  Many industries are having a tough time, but the newspaper business must be amongst the very hardest hit. Monks working painstakingly on complex, decorative manuscripts in European monasteries didn’t know what hit them when Gutenberg figured out how to have moveable type on the printing press in the 15th century.  It was a moment of Schumpeterian creative destruction. By the 17th century some form of newspaper had appeared almost everywhere in early modern Europe. Today, there are an estimated 7,000 newspapers in business around the world and the World Association of Newspapers claim that each day over half the world’s population read a newspaper, with sales of 2.5bn copies in print and 600m online; making it a $200bn industry.   Another Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – Two Days In

  Landed here in Cyprus two days ago to begin my six month sabbatical. Ryanair got us to Paphos on time as usual and also dispelled the urban myth about their customer service - they were warm as well as effective. When the plane door opened the plane's air was replaced by warm moist and fragrant 28 degree Cypriot atmosphere - kinaesthetic proof to the traveller that you truly have arrived in a different country. Cyprus, despite its recent difficulties, has seen significant investment over the past 10 years and Paphos airport has been a beneficiary. It's slick, functional and you can see why, apart from its strategic location, that it has become one of Ryanair's latest hubs. Passports and bags were quickly administered and we were on our way. The next evidence of prosperity is the road system. Continue reading here [...]