Exploring the Competencies, Skills and Behaviours of Effective Workplace Mediators

Two reports named Shaping the Agenda 1 and 2 were officially launched on Monday 10th October 2016 in Maynooth University Ireland. The research team is from the Kennedy Institute Workplace Mediation Research Group (KIWMRG), with this particular research project led by Dr Deirdre Curran (NUIG) and commissioned by the Mediators’ Institute of Ireland (MII), the professional association for mediators in Ireland. The research identified the competencies, skills and behaviours of workplace mediators through an extensive literature review (and reported in the report entitled: Shaping the Agenda 1: Exploring the Competencies, Skills and Behaviours of Effective Workplace Mediators), and highlighted the implications for the development of workplace mediation in Ireland (published in the report: Shaping Continue reading here [...]

What national and regional overviews of sustainability in business, management and executive education tell us (and what they don’t!).

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 My recent study of the growth of the sustainability discourse in the field of business, management and executive education indicated that the field has undergone considerable growth over the last two decades, and that this growth accelerated in recent years.  … Continue reading

A comment on the junior doctors’ strike….

It is shocking to think that, in 2013, highly educated and trained individuals are pushed to working excessive, slave-labour hours. Enough is enough and the junior doctors have had no choice but to take a stand and fight for better conditions. Not only are the excessive hours a threat to patient care, they also impact on the individuals themselves, who are more at risk of burnout from excessive work pressures arising from habitually working overtime. Besides physical health risks, the psychological risks and business risks are also increased, with implications on morale, productivity, performance and talent retention. Who wants to work somewhere they feel unappreciated, overworked and ignored? The psychological contract has been severely, if not irreparably damaged here and it is going Continue reading here [...]

Branding at Best: A Good African Story

The setting was perfect for the launch of Coffee entrepreneur and author Andrew Rugasira book “A Good African Story: How a small company built a global coffee brand” at Bewley’s Grafton St. on Wednesday 2nd Oct. I had the privilege of chairing this event alongside Conall O'Caoimh (Co-Director of Value Added in Africa) and Mr Sean Hoy (Deputy Director of Africa, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade). But this was much more than a book launch, this was a real story of the challenges and opportunities created by a small business owner in a difficult climate... Andrew is a confident but unassuming business person who exhibited through the Q&A session a real sense of what and how his business has strove to achieve over the past ten years. He stated... "What no Ugandan coffee Continue reading here [...]

Added Value in Africa: Social Enterprise Making Good Business Sense

When we talk and think about International Marketing, big names such as Coca Cola, Unilever, P&G, Tesco, IKEA, IBM... and many more come to mind for their operations and their market dominance in countries such as America, Australia or one of the BRICs. Successful Companies in Developed Countries. However, On Tuesday 26th February, students of MN313 International Marketing got an another perspective of what it means to be an International firm but this time in the developing country of Africa... not the typical country of choice we may first think of when thinking about these Big Brand firms! Conall O’Caoimh, Director of Added Value in Africa provided an insightful and very exciting presentation of Africa as a market of opportunity for foreign investment as well as outward investment... Conall Continue reading here [...]

Why it’s important to be critical about sustainability.

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In a recent two part blogpost I discussed the idea of Civil religion (part 1), in order to explore some of the evidence for how sustainability was becoming ‘sacralized’ in contemporary social and organisational practices (part 2).  I’m certainly not … Continue reading