Interested in research? Thinking of undertaking a PhD? Thinking of a career in academia? Why not consider undertaking a PhD in Maynooth University’s School of Business.

Interested in research? Thinking of undertaking a PhD? Thinking of a career in academia? Why not consider undertaking a PhD in Maynooth University's School of Business. Not for the faint-hearted, a full-time PhD journey takes four years (six years part-time) and is a major intellectual undertaking, involving philosophy, theory and empirical research, focusing on a particular research question within a particular research discipline.  If it is something you are considering, why not consider undertaking a PhD in the School of Business at Maynooth University? The research interests of the School of Business faculty can be found here: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/school-business/our-people. My own research interests in the areas of qualitative research, HRM, careers, international mobility Continue reading here [...]

Portrayal of Skilled Migrants – Recent Publication

Check out my recent publication, with two great colleagues: Crowley-Henry, M., O Connor, E. and Al Ariss, A. (2016) “Portrayal of Skilled Migrants’ Careers in Business and Management Studies: A Review of the Literature and Future Research Agenda”. European Management Review, DOI: 10.1002/emre.12072. Abstract A systematic literature review in business and management studies was conducted, which paints a portrait of the existing literature on skilled migrants’ host country career experiences. Core themes arising from this review are presented, including labeling inconsistency concerning the population (with researchers using terminology such as‘skilled migrants,’ ‘immigrant professionals’ and ‘qualified immigrants’ interchangeably); the need for including skilled migrant Continue reading here [...]

16th International Conference on Human Resource Development and Practice Across Europe

The 16th International Conference on Human Resource Development and Practice across Europe takes place in University College Cork (Ireland) from 3rd-5th June 2015. With ca. 350 attendees from all over the world, blended from practitioners and academics in the area of human resource development, the conference is a huge success.  Professor Sandra Robinson (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada) gave a keynote presentation on 3rd June looking at the role of trust in HRD, sharing very interesting research, including that, sometimes, too much trust can have negative outcomes (such as reduced performance in teams or reduced negotiated outcomes for individuals), which she calls 'the dark side' of trust. Professor Michael Morley (University of Limerick, Ireland) gave a keynote presentation Continue reading here [...]

1st International Conference on Self-Initiated Expatriation

Greetings from the prestigious Toulouse Business School (EQUIS, AACSB, AMBA accredited), which is hosting the 1st international conference on self-initiated expatriation (28-29 May 2015). With ca. 50 participants representing institutions as far away as Massey University New Zealand and the key academics in this growing field, the inaugural conference is a huge success. Self-initiated expatriation is a phenomenon which has been receiving increasing academic attention in international management and international human resource management literature in the past decade. It highlights the fact that most international mobility is self initiated as opposed to sponsored by organizations, and that much research remains to be done in this area, unpacking the motivations, experiences and challenges Continue reading here [...]

Thinking of doing a PhD?

For some, doing a PhD is because it is a 'nice to have' qualification or is imposed on them through their work context, rather that being something they have always aspired to do. However, I have found that those that actually complete a PhD (which is a four-year full time process; much longer for part-timers!) do so because they really WANT it and make/find the time to finish it by incorporating it as part of their lives (living, breathing, working it). For myself, when I completed my MSc by research many moons ago, the 'bug' for academic reading, scrutiny, reflection, research and discussion was initiated. It was tough, it was isolating and lonely, but it was rewarding and invigorating: exploring a topic from a particular perspective (or perspectives) in order to further the existing knowledge Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – Doing the Basics

HRM received bad press recently with many commentators questioning its value to organisations. The resignation of the HR Director of the BBC has raised questions over the efficacy of the discipline. Why the resignation of one person should spark calls for a review of the area or even questions over the feminsation of HR is anyone's guess. But harm us it has and we need to think hard about how we got here and more importantly how we are going to get away from this negative spotlight. This is important for all of us as we go through the 'Ulrichisation' of the profession - a time of great change. But it's also important not least women, because HR has been one of the areas where women have succeeded most in achieving management positions. Last week in this blog I suggested that academics and Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – The ADDIE Model, Practitioners and Academics Living Apart

Having crossed over the line between HRM practice and academia I am conscious more than ever of how these two communities live very much apart. I'm sure the way it's supposed to work is that the practice 'surfaces' its concerns and the academia takes up the challenge ultimately informing practice of what its concerns should  be. Or something like that. However, during my time as a practitioner I never felt assisted by Irish academics helping me to understand my challenges as a manager and now that I'm in academia I'm often puzzled at how oblivious Practice is regarding the work that is going on in Irish universities. A good example of this is the ADDIE model. This model is a staple approach to identifying training needs and implementing and evaluating training. Developed (perhaps) by the Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – Two Days In

  Landed here in Cyprus two days ago to begin my six month sabbatical. Ryanair got us to Paphos on time as usual and also dispelled the urban myth about their customer service - they were warm as well as effective. When the plane door opened the plane's air was replaced by warm moist and fragrant 28 degree Cypriot atmosphere - kinaesthetic proof to the traveller that you truly have arrived in a different country. Cyprus, despite its recent difficulties, has seen significant investment over the past 10 years and Paphos airport has been a beneficiary. It's slick, functional and you can see why, apart from its strategic location, that it has become one of Ryanair's latest hubs. Passports and bags were quickly administered and we were on our way. The next evidence of prosperity is the road system. Continue reading here [...]

Self-initiated expatriation and migration in the management literature: Present theorizations and future research directions

Dr Marian Crowley-Henry, lecturer in Human Resource Management and International Management in the School of Business at the National University of Ireland Maynooth has recently published an article in Career Development International (Volume 18, Issue 1, pp. 78-96). Marian co-authored the article with an international colleague, Dr Akram Al Ariss, entitled 'Self-initiated expatriation and migration in the management literature: Present theorizations and future research directions'. The paper presents a critical discussion (through a systematic review) on how self-initiated expatriation (SIE) is theorized compared to migration in the management literature. The paper also indicates avenues for future research on SIE, a growing area of research interest on global mobility. To  link to the Continue reading here [...]