Publishing Pressures & the Job Demands-Resources Model… Demands Overload/Resources Shortfall in Academia

Some musings while I am working on a paper involving the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model... Discussions in academic institutions, at least among peers at the lower-to-mid hierarchical levels, centre on the increasing academic workloads - growing class sizes, burgeoning administrative duties - facing academics. Meanwhile, pressure (self-imposed and/or institutionally required) to consistently publish quality research in good quality journals is mounting higher and higher. Indeed, when it comes to promotion panels, generally more kudos is given to your publication record than to any other task performed. What is generally meant by 'good quality journals' are those that are ranked 3 or 4 star in the ABS peer journal ranking (for Business academics at least). For the non-academic readers, Continue reading here [...]

Talent Management of Millennials

Talent management is gaining recognition as an organisational concern which has been under-explored in academic research and literature. Perhaps the difficulty in conceptualising talent management academically is because talent management potentially encompasses several different organisational behaviour and human resource management concepts and practices, which render an unpacking of talent management complex. Does talent management focus on all HRM practices or just on performance management/employee development? Is talent management for all employees or just for the 'A' players? These are just some questions which set the foundations for a current piece of research I am working on in collaboration with Dr Mary Collins ( Senior Executive Development Specialist, Royal College Continue reading here [...]

Thinking of doing a PhD?

For some, doing a PhD is because it is a 'nice to have' qualification or is imposed on them through their work context, rather that being something they have always aspired to do. However, I have found that those that actually complete a PhD (which is a four-year full time process; much longer for part-timers!) do so because they really WANT it and make/find the time to finish it by incorporating it as part of their lives (living, breathing, working it). For myself, when I completed my MSc by research many moons ago, the 'bug' for academic reading, scrutiny, reflection, research and discussion was initiated. It was tough, it was isolating and lonely, but it was rewarding and invigorating: exploring a topic from a particular perspective (or perspectives) in order to further the existing knowledge Continue reading here [...]

Academy of International Business 2014

The past days I have been attending the Academy of International Business (AIB) conference in Vancouver. It is my first time at this international conference and my first time in Vancouver. A large international conference, it is dwarfed by the Academy of Management (AOM) annual conference, with participant numbers of 1,000 or thereabouts rather than 10,000 at AOM, making it quite an accessible conference in comparison. The disciplines represented span across strategy, economics, entrepreneurship, human resource management, cross cultural studies, all with the common emphasis on the international context. Indeed, one of the most prevailing themes of the conference is the focus on context - time and space. Geoffrey Jones (Harvard University), in the opening plenary session, highlighted the Continue reading here [...]

School of Business Academic receives Emerald Highly Commended Paper Award

Dr Graham Heaslip has been awarded the Highly Commended Paper Award by the publisher Emerald. Dr Heaslip’s paper “Services operations management and Humanitarian Logistics” published in the Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management has been selected as a Highly Commended Paper. The Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management Editorial Team selected the paper as one of the most impressive pieces of work the team has seen. The paper can be viewed at: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=2042-6747&volume=3&issue=1&articleid=17088900&show=htmlThe global publisher Emerald annually awards papers from each of its journals with the Highly Commended Award, amongst other awards. Continue reading here [...]

National University of Ireland Maynooth’s Postgraduate Scholarships

Note the upcoming deadlines for National University of Ireland Maynooth (NUIM) postgraduate scholarships. The John & Pat Hume scholarship closes on 6th May 2014. The Taught Masters Bursaries deadline is 2nd June 2014. Application forms and terms and conditions for both schemes will be available for download from the Graduate Studies website. Click on the website link for the respective application form and further information: http://www.nuim.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships 

Writing for academic conferences

'Tis the season to be writing.... As a business academic, the first academic term is incredibly busy, not only with orientations, teaching and administration as well as the routine research focus, but mainly because the deadlines for the submission of papers to many conferences in 2014 is in early January. 'If you snooze, you lose...' If you are unprepared, have nothing written to submit before that deadline, you lose out on participating in many of the quality international conferences of the academic calendar (for instance Academy of International Business (AIB), Academy of Management (AOM), European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS), European Academy of Management (Euram)...). Not only do you miss out on presenting your current research interests in a forum of academics with whom Continue reading here [...]

NUIM Teaching Fellowship Awards – Report 2012-2013

I was successful in being awarded a NUIM teaching fellowship for 2012-2013 which examined achieving fairness in assessing student group work. This was the first teaching fellowship awarded to the School of Business. The results from the fellowship have just been published by the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) in  NUI Maynooth. This blog highlights the findings of the fellowship; the full report will be available on eprints. In my view the promise of group work as a teaching and learning method can only be fully realized if perennial problems such as accurate and fair assessment of individual group member performance, intra-group conflict, and free riding are successfully tackled. I have long been intrigued by the promise of using peer evaluation to maximize the learning value that Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – Doing the Basics

HRM received bad press recently with many commentators questioning its value to organisations. The resignation of the HR Director of the BBC has raised questions over the efficacy of the discipline. Why the resignation of one person should spark calls for a review of the area or even questions over the feminsation of HR is anyone's guess. But harm us it has and we need to think hard about how we got here and more importantly how we are going to get away from this negative spotlight. This is important for all of us as we go through the 'Ulrichisation' of the profession - a time of great change. But it's also important not least women, because HR has been one of the areas where women have succeeded most in achieving management positions. Last week in this blog I suggested that academics and Continue reading here [...]