Sabbatical Post – Doing the Basics

HRM received bad press recently with many commentators questioning its value to organisations. The resignation of the HR Director of the BBC has raised questions over the efficacy of the discipline. Why the resignation of one person should spark calls for a review of the area or even questions over the feminsation of HR is anyone's guess. But harm us it has and we need to think hard about how we got here and more importantly how we are going to get away from this negative spotlight. This is important for all of us as we go through the 'Ulrichisation' of the profession - a time of great change. But it's also important not least women, because HR has been one of the areas where women have succeeded most in achieving management positions. Last week in this blog I suggested that academics and Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – The ADDIE Model, Practitioners and Academics Living Apart

Having crossed over the line between HRM practice and academia I am conscious more than ever of how these two communities live very much apart. I'm sure the way it's supposed to work is that the practice 'surfaces' its concerns and the academia takes up the challenge ultimately informing practice of what its concerns should  be. Or something like that. However, during my time as a practitioner I never felt assisted by Irish academics helping me to understand my challenges as a manager and now that I'm in academia I'm often puzzled at how oblivious Practice is regarding the work that is going on in Irish universities. A good example of this is the ADDIE model. This model is a staple approach to identifying training needs and implementing and evaluating training. Developed (perhaps) by the Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – Crossing The Line

Nicosia is the last divided city in Europe - a title inherited when Berlin was unified over 20 years ago. You can step across the Green Line dividing the city without much fuss these days. The authorities on the south side minimise the perception that this is a de facto border. Those on the north side make every attempt to convince you that you have stepped into another jurisdiction.  Most of what first hits you in the narrow lanes there are street vendors selling cheap goods of all sorts to attract the southern and tourist euro. But there are some interesting sights to see that have been left over from previous occupations. Selimye mosque is one such venue. Built by the Lusignans in the 12th century it was subsequently taken over by the Ottomans in the Middle Ages when it became a mosque. Continue reading here [...]

Sabbatical Post – One Week In

This is one of the abiding images of Cyprus. It is the representation of the flag of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (recognised only by Turkey). It is etched into the Pentactylos mountain range in the occupied area across the Green Line that divides the two communities on this beautiful island. Inhabitants of Nicosia come face to face with this image daily as it is visible from almost every part of the city. It is, perhaps, meant to be a provocative reminder to those on the south side of the line of everything they have lost as a result of the Turkish invasion of 1974. One hesitates to ask older residents what they feel about this for fear of stoking up hurt or anger. But maybe that's my issue because although I focus on this image, Cypriots seem to ignore it. This is mostly true Continue reading here [...]